Northland on the Te Araroa

Northland

Day 1: Puhoi to Route 1: 27km

We had set up our tents the night before in the dark. In the morning we woke up to find ourselves next to some sort of horse farm. We packed up and in the process John managed to step on one of the tent stakes with his bare feet, ripping a hole in the bottom of his foot.

Soon we started walking. The day was not very eventful. We walked quite a bit through overgrown trail or on roads – mostly nice and easy going gravel roads, but occasionally some slightly more busy roads.

On trail, we kept going up a few hundred meters and back down again, and it felt like my legs had forgotten how to walk. Five days of volunteering on a small island and I was already out of shape?

We managed to walk 30km by about 3pm to arrive at a cafe. I took off my shoes to find that my feet had a bit of trench foot, and I decided to put on dry socks, which helped them recover quite quickly. Johns foot hurt from his little accident in the morning.

We tried to find a place to camp, and found that we missed the spot that we were aiming for by about 2km. We didn’t want to go back, and the folks at the cafe agreed to let us camp next to the picnic tables near their parking lot.

Unfortunately we are set up next to Route 1 which is loud with lots of trucks passing by, but we’re hoping that the traffic dies down overnight.

Day 2: Route 1 to Pakiri Beach, 26km

I woke up several times overnight when cars or trucks were particularly loud. At 4:45am a rooster started crowing, and I gave up on sleep and opted to call my mother.

We started walking just before dawn break shortly after 6am.

“Last night was romantic” said Martin sarcastically. I wish I could be as funny as Martin in a foreign language.

We headed up to Dome Summit. From there the track was quite difficult with lots of ups and downs keeping us working hard. We had a short but scary road walk to get to the next track which was very poorly maintained up towards Conical Peak.

We bumped into a French guy who claimed to be a SOBO. We were all intrigued. A SOBO starting in May? He explained that he was planning on hiking through the winter and he brought crampons and other winter gear to get him through. I made sure to get his name to look him up on facebook: Kevin Fuentes. I can’t wait to follow his journey.

We passed by a summit with some day hikers, but they must have come a different way because before we knew it we were climbing up a stupidly muddy track along a barbed wire fence which had a mixture of deep sloshy and slippery mud, cow shit and gorse (prickly bushes). There was no way day hikers were walking on this. The mud could be described as clay that has been extruded through thousands of cow hooves. It was so bad we couldn’t stop laughing. It was slightly less funny when the mud kept just kept going and going.

Just when we were thoroughly covered in mud and cow shit, we got to the top of a hill, went over a stile, and headed down a ridiculously grassy pasture with ankle busting lumps under waist high grass to give your ankles a work-out. At one point I twisted my ankle and fell – luckily the grass was soft, but I was not amused.

We had several kilometers of downhill through this thick grass before we finally hit the road. It wasn’t a long road walk, but my right hip hurt, my knees hurt and my feet hurt, so I was ready to be done. It had been a long day.

We finally got to the Holiday Park at Pakiri Beach, and for only $20 per person we were able to get a cabin. We had showers and did laundry. It felt good to be clean and to sleep inside.

Day 3: Pakiri Beach to Mangawhai Heads, 30km

We set our alarms for 5am so as to be able to hike at low tide. We read in the trail notes that we had two estuary crossings that were about 7-8km apart, and if we were to hit either one close to high tide, they could be chest deep. No thanks. Especially in the cool autumn temperatures. Low tide was around 6am, and we hit the beach right around then.

The first estuary crossing was straight away, and impossible to see because it was pitch dark out. I blindly followed Martin who was using the Guthook App on his phone to navigate towards the crossing point. Meanwhile I felt like we were just blindly walking towards ocean/water. Finally, the crossing was only about ankle deep, and once we were across, we had an easy beach walk while enjoying the sun rise. The sun didn’t rise until after 7am, confirming my belief that we now have between 10 and 11 hours of daylight per day.

Soon a rainbow appeared on the horizon, followed by a rain shower, and again blue skies. Several minutes later, the same thing happened again.

It was tough for me to keep up with John and Martin on the beach. My pace is simply slower. Martin must be over 6ft tall, and of course John is 6ft 4, so I’m trotting behind them trying to move my legs as quickly as possible.

It never got too warm, and 15km later we hit a rocky outcropping where they trail went up and around on a trail. We decided to try to scramble around the rocks instead since it was still somewhat low tide. It was precarious and the rocks were sharp. We scrambled up and down and around, and finally got to a point where the water came right up to the cliff, and we could not get past. Darn. We had to go back and take the trail instead.

We had a bit more beach walking after that until we got to the road leading to Mangawhai. The road walking was killing me. My hips hurt as did my feet. I spend quite a lot of time just wishing I was better at walking. I know that’s dumb, but seriously, I’m sick of being the weakest link. I’m always the slowest, the one who is in pain, and the one who has to try the hardest to keep up. It’s annoying. There aren’t enough women on long distance hikes. I’m not saying this because women are necessarily slower, but perhaps in general they are better at empathizing.

On top of being in pain, I was also zombie-walking. Waking up at 5am two mornings in a row caught up with me, and I was very tired.

I decided to stick out my thumb on the road, and someone stopped to pick us up. We weren’t far from Mangawhai Heads, so we only saved a couple of km, and moments after we got dropped off at the supermarket, Martin walked up. That’s how much faster he had been walking since the rock scramble fiasco. Sigh.

I was ready to sit down and get food.

Town was nice. We took a long break, ate some fish and chips and bought some groceries before walking on along the beach to the Holiday Park where we could camp.

I’m pretty sure I’m going to be fast asleep by 7pm.

Day 4: Mangawhai Heads to Waipu, 23km

After about 12 hours of sleep we emerged from our tents. We had a small road walk to get past an inlet and back on the beach again. The beach walk was all too short, and after looking at the map we decided we could make it longer by continuing on the beach along a rocky stretch where we figured we could get around while it was still mid-tide.

This turned out to be true- but just barely! We went through a rock archway which was just starting to fill up with water, but we were able to squeeze through before we would had to get our feet wet.

From there there was a beautiful trail leading up away from the beach. This trail was built like a great walk trail – wide, well graded and with tons of stairs. The other thing there were tons of were wasps. These seemed to be mainly of a different variety than the European wasps, which we would call “yellowjackets” in the States. I believe that these wasps were paper wasps. My suspicion is that they build their nests in the tall thick flax leaves.

We then kept traveling up through farm fields with great views of the coastline and the beautiful green hilly farm fields. It’s amazing how green the grass is here. Is looks like high definition bright green.

The trail passed over a road and we continued on past a ghost community. It was a gated community that had been built with roads and some landscaping, but no houses, just lots of land that looked like they were once for sale. It just looked like an abandoned project. Planted trees were dead and the grass hadn’t been mown in months, maybe years. The trail continued a ways through native bush on a really nice trail.

Unfortunately the trail ended at a gravel road which meandered through logged forest with blazing sun for many kilometers before we hit the main road again where we could hitchhike to Waipu.

In Waipu we found that the Waipu Hotel had camping in the back for $8 per person which included a shower. One of the best deals on the trail so far.

Day 5: Waipu to Whangarei Heads, unknown distance.

Today we needed to get around the huge inlet that makes up Whangarei Harbor. The trail kind of just ends at one side and carries on at Whangarei Heads. Apparently you can sometimes find someone to help you across by boat, but we decided to hitchhike around so as to be able to hit the Pak n Save (cheaper grocery store) and the library in Whangarei on the way to Whangarei Heads. It turned out not to be hard to hitchhike, and we were able to resupply without spending a fortune. Lots of the smaller coastal towns only have convenience stores, called Four Squares, which are much more expensive.

Once at Whangarei Heads, the trail follows a road for quite some time, and we decided to spend the night at a place called the “Bus Stop”, which had camping spots with a sort of outdoor kitchen and a toilet. Since it was still early in the day when we got there, we decided to take a scenic side trail, the Mount Manaia Track. This track is not on the Te Araroa, but looked pretty cool, and only took us 30 minutes to reach the top, climbing up a ton of stairs about 400 meters up. I was pretty proud to make it up in half the time written on the trail head sign.

The views from the top were fantastic, giving us a view of the coast that we had just covered the previous days along with the inlet that we had navigated around. Near the inlet was the only oil refinery in New Zealand.

The rock formations around the top of this mountain were equally stunning.

We hiked back down and set up camp at the Bus Stop. It was a really nice little spot.

Day 6: Whangarei Heads to Taiharuru (TA Walker’s Camp), 22km

Today’s walk was great. It started with a walk on the Te Whara Track, which climbed up a never ending staircase to the top of a rocky ridge, in a similar fashion to the side trail that we took yesterday. My legs were tired, probably from all the stairs yesterday, but eventually, when we did make it to the top, the views were well worth it. The track itself was also very nice. A lot of effort must have gone in to install all the stairs, and the trail was free of mud, and mostly not overgrown. This must be a popular day hike.

From the end of that track, we started a long beach walk along Ocean Beach. I was surprised by how many banded dotterels we saw running along the beach. These birds are endangered, and there are apparently only about 1,500 of them left. But, they’ve got to live somewhere, and this is obviously their habitat.

The beach walk was slightly too long. It was sunny out, which I’m seriously not complaining about since we’ve been so lucky with the weather this week, but I think the sun made me quite tired. My feet also grew tired of walking on sand.

I was happy when it was over and we had another hill to climb. This was Kauri Mountain. I wouldn’t really call it a mountain, but it was a nice hill with lots of Kauri trees.

We had planned on staying at a place called Tidesong, where some trail angels help hikers get across another inlet, which is crossable at low tide, but at high tide they can help hikers across by boat. They also offer accommodation. But we gave them a call, and they were not at home, but sounded like very nice people.

Coming down from the “mountain”, we decided to stop at TA walkers camp, a little spot almost a kilometer off the trail/road which someone erected for hikers. There is a small cabin with a hot water shower and two beds. Nobody had been here in months, and we had to figure out how to connect the hot water heater. We wound up having to call the owner for help, and they were surprised that anyone was still hiking this time of year. They sorted out the water and apologized that they hadn’t cleaned the place out in a while. We weren’t too worried.

After they left though, the number of spiders and other bugs in the cabin started to make me feel slightly uncomfortable. There were hundreds of spiders everywhere with webs all over the place. On top of that, as darkness fell, I saw several cockroaches crawling around. John also evicted two wasps, which I was particularly unhappy to discover. I felt bad because I almost wanted to pitch the tent outside. Instead I decided to just take the bug netting part of the tent and sleep in that using the umbrella inside of it to keep it off my face.

This is a nice place otherwise- obviously a lot of thought and work has gone into it, it’s just that we’re here very much off-season as most of the hikers come through southbound many months earlier. I was pleased that the shower had shampoo and conditioner, and they had tea and coffee along with a few other things. I bet this is a nice place during the right season.

Martin had hiked ahead and camped near the edge of the estuary. I soon realized that we wouldn’t see him again.

Day 7: Walker’s Camp to Tidesong, 3km

Strangely, today is our last day on the TA, and since we need to be in Auckland tomorrow, we didn’t want to hike away from the road that would get us out of this area. We decided that we wanted to stay with the really nice sounding Trail Angels just a few km down the trail, half way across the estuary. We were able to cross the estuary at low tide. The water was only up to my mid thigh, and the mud wasn’t much deeper than my shoes.

Before we knew it we were at Tidesong having a cup of coffee with Hugh and Ros, a lovely couple who have done quite a lot of the Te Araroa Trail to raise awareness for kidney transplants. Ros donated one of her kidneys to Hugh, so between them they only have two kidneys. Seems like a huge success story.

We spent the day chatting with our hosts, wandering around the trails on their property and organizing our gear for our next volunteer gig at Tiri Tiri Matanga Island, which we are super excited about.

It’s kind of a weird and anticlimactic finish to a long distance hike, and I kind of wish we had the time to make it to Cape Regina to see the end of the trail, but it’s really not about the destination, and we were lucky to have been able to hike a lot of this trail while still seeing many other parts of New Zealand along the way.

We may not have done a purist thru-hike of the TA, in fact we didn’t even do what I would really call a thru-hike, but I do think we’ve seen most of the best bits of this trail at this point so I have very little regret.

Going into this trip, I had a lot of doubt about my abilities to do this and other hikes. My right hip still aches on almost a daily basis and my frozen shoulder is still frozen and causing pain up my neck and down my back. I’m lucky I was able to hike at all and that my ailments have only slowed me down rather than stopped me entirely.

I really hope that I can inspire people who aren’t in perfect shape to attempt long distance trails. Injuries, disabilities, illnesses, etc. shouldn’t keep you from hiking, even thru-hiking at your own pace. I have to admit it has been a really hard adjustment for me to take it more slowly and accept a certain level of pain, and I often times wonder if this is the new normal, or if in years to come I will once again be able to pound out 20-30 miles a day, day after day. I try not to focus on these thoughts though, but rather on what I CAN do.

Soon I will post a wrap up blog about the TA – with all my thoughts about this trail and hopefully this will be of use to some of you contemplating doing it. I certainly have a few opinions to share!

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